Lava Lake

As of this morning, the lava was about 13 feet from the rim of the Overlook crater and getting ready to spill into the larger Halema’uma’u crater.

For background, I’ve cut and pasted the following text directly from the USGS site that is here http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/activity/kilaueastatus.php

The summit lava lake is within an elliptical crater (unofficially called the Overlook crater), which has dimensions of approximately 160 m (520 ft) by 210 m (690 ft), inset within the eastern portion of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. The lake level has varied from about 25 m to more than 200 m (out of sight) below the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. The Overlook crater has been more-or-less continuously active since it opened during a small explosive event on March 19, 2008. The lake level responds to summit tilt changes with the lake generally receding during deflation and rising during inflation. Since 2013, the lava level has been typically between 30 m (100 ft) and 60 m (200 ft) below the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. Small collapses in the Overlook crater are common, and over time have resulted in a gradual enlargement of the Overlook crater. The ambient SO2 concentrations near the vent vary greatly, but are persistently higher than 10 ppm and frequently exceed 50 ppm (upper limit of detector) during moderate trade winds. The gas plume typically includes a small amount of ash-sized tephra (mostly fresh spatter bits and Pele’s hair from the circulating lava lake). The heaviest pieces are deposited onto nearby surfaces while the finer bits can be carried several kilometers before dropping out of the plume.

You can check the live webcam at Volcanoes here http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/panorama.php?cam=KIcam

Don’t be surprised if the view is vogged/fogged in much of the time.

Who knows how long this will continue, it may end tonight and it might just continue to fill the larger crater.  Since I know most of you cannot make the trek to see it, I’ve brought it you in the following video from early this morning.  The video was shot at the visitor center, just a little over a mile away from the lava lake.

About Ron Bailey

Ron Bailey is a photographer living and working in Hawaii, USA. Ron worked as the project photographer for the Tomb Restoration Project at the Colorado Yule Marble Quarry beginning in 2003, and continues to document the ever changing Yule Quarry, amassing the largest photo/video library in the world of the quarry and holds the exclusive rights to shoot the historic property. His images of Western Colorado show the unique nature of this wild west state and now Ron is photographing the sometimes dangerous wildness of the Big Island, Hawaii. With the 2014 tropical storm, several wind storms and the current lava flow, Old Hawaii is in danger of disappearing on the Big Island. Ron intends to document what he can before it is gone forever.

Posted on April 26, 2015, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: